Migraine Week

So, on Sunday afternoon, I managed to seriously burn my mouth whilst eating (Having taken 10mg of diazepam and 20 of morphine to stop a very painful hip dislocation getting any worse, which basically meant that I couldn’t feel the inside of my mouth. Not even when I put a whole roast potato at 200 degrees into it, and bit, and chewed, and swallowed.)

By very late on Sunday evening, the whole roof of my mouth, the back of my throat, and all of my gums were one big blister, bad enough that all of the teeth in the hard palate were loose.

On Monday morning, I woke up with my jaw dislocated, which slowly got worse and worse, and I was reduced to eating nothing but oat milk.

On Tuesday morning, it was the same – Sore teeth, tempromandibular joint in pieces, unable to eat, and, worst of all, starting to get a migraine.

At about 19.45, I took a zomig and got in the shower to try to clear my head. By 20.00, I’d fallen out of the shower into a completely dark room, had tied a cashmere shawl over my eyes with a full bag of frozen coriander jammed into the worst of the eye-sockets and was screaming. I couldn’t lift my head off the pillow, or turn my neck, or move my jaw at all. I later described the sensation as “Like having a metal spike stuck in through the brow bone just above the left eye, exiting through the roof of the mouth, then lodging into the TMJ. Whilst fellating a lit blowtorch.”

And it stayed like that for several hours. Getting worse.

I called up Dearest, who switched on the low, green “migraine safe” lights (still too bright, through the edges of the blindfold), checked that I wasn’t actually having a stroke, and phoned 111.

111 were, predictably, useless.
– The nurse was angry that he couldn’t tell whether I “couldn’t” look at bright lights or “just didn’t want to”. The answer of “It hurts so much that they can’t” wasn’t good enough.
– The nurse was angry that he, and then I, couldn’t state whether I was “in pain” or “feeling very unwell” since the answer was both.
– The nurse was *incredibly* angry that we were certain that this was a very bad migraine, rather than meningitis (Occam’s razor does suggest that a migraine-like pain in a migraineur, who describes the pain as “exactly like my normal migraine, just worse” will be a migraine)
– The nurse was apoplectic with rage that we wanted advice on whether to take a second Zomig, or to take morphine. We were treating them like a medical advice line!
– The nurse insisted that she knew EXACTLY, and much better than I did, how a hospital trip (to somewhere full of flashing lights and loud noises) would affect me, and that it wouldn’t be as bad as I thought. Despite our repeatedly explaining that I had EDS (Which she repeatedly told us she “Didn’t know what that was, so didn’t think it would matter”) which would make it impossible to travel.
-The nurse finally assented to send out some paramedics, who would do a better job at looking after me.

That converssation took something more than an hour. How Dearest didn’t just fling the phone across the room, I will not know.

The paramedics arrived, and were genuinely brilliant. Clocked my pulse and blood pressure (146bpm, 130/100ish) checked my pupil response (Pupils not responding at all, patient hissing in pain, eyes watering, flinching away from light) and sat with me as I took literally as much morphine as I could safely take (There wasn’t likely to be any interaction, but it was helpful to have trained people on-hand in case my heart stopped).

The pain started subsiding, down to about a six. Blood pressure, again – 120/80. 80bpm. The paramedics started to relent on the insistence that I had to go to hospital, and transmuted into “You should go to the GP tomorrow.”

Eventually, they left. I passed out.

Phoned the GP at 13.30 the next day, as the pain got bad enough to wake me up, and was resoundingly told off by the receptionist that I hadn’t phoned at 8am. All appointments, even emergency appointments, went at 8am, there was no other way of getting them. Even having been told by the paramedics that it was medically necessary. They were all gone. Gone gone gone. And I was a bad person for not being able to wake up in the middle of morphine-induced migraine-sleep.

I pointed out that it would be on her head if I ended up back in A+E that night. She gave me an appointment at 17.40. That appointment must have been available anyway, so I have no idea why she tried to make me not take it in the first place. Maybe she just enjoyed hurting people.

By the time I got to the appointment, my head felt like it was being trampled on, again, and I could barely lift my head. Not to mention the intense photophobia. The doctor – One I’d not met before, Dr A – was sympathetic, and took my heart rate again whilst reading the paramedics’ notes. 112bpm. Still worryingly high, but also very much proving my point that I was really in pain, not just complaining. He advised doubling my zomig dose (Taking a second one two hours after the first, if there was no improvement) and just calling the rest of the week a write-off.

It was pretty much Friday night before the pain even started subsiding, and it’s still ongoing as we speak. So looks like this is going to be another incredibly long migraine.

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4 thoughts on “Migraine Week

  1. As a fellow migraine sufferer (I used to get agonising three day attacks) I have massive empathy. I get the one-sided stabbing pain behind one eye too. I also get nausea and crying all the time as the icing on the cake (you probably had those as well given your acute suffering).

    What makes me cross is that you had to FIGHT (or Dearest and you did) to get the care you needed and were entitled to. Which rather makes the whole experience even worse than it need be.

    I finally managed to coerce my GP into giving me a referral to a specialise neurology migraine clinic – she kept telling me my problem was ‘stress’. Right, yes, that’s it. Stress!

    Grrrr. {{{Gentle hugs}}}

    • Thank you – I’ve been lucky to avoid the nausea. Must admit, I was thinking of you and your long migraine that you had earlier this year when this one started up. Hope you’re doing better now.

      And oh god yes, I cry like a tap. Out of the one functioning tearduct, which looks really silly too, making it all the worse.

  2. Those long ones are exhausting! It’s also really hard when none of the treatments seem to really work. I have finally found some relief (after 15 years). A change in my diet has significantly reduced the number and severity of my migraines. I can’t control many of my triggers (weather, fragrances, etc.), but I’m learning to control my diet. I’m posting my thoughts and recipes, if you want to visit my site. I’m hoping to pass along something helpful to other migraineurs .

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